Saturday, December 29, 2012

Lucy Spraggan - (original) - Tea and Toast - Ont' Sofa



Lucy Spraggan sits Ont' Sofa and performs her beautiful song Tea and Toast.

Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ontsofa
Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OntSofa

Ont' Sofa's mission is to bring quality musicians and artists to your ears and eyes! We are asking REAL talented musicians and artists to sit Ont' Sofa and show the world what real music is all about!

www.facebook.com/lucyspraggan
@lspraggan

http://www.vidacp.com

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Cultivate a Friendship with Death by Tim Ong

Why We Fear Death

"Men fear death as children fear to go in the dark." - Bacon

There may be a thousand reasons why we fear death, but most of all we fear death because we fear the unknown, and death is an unknown entity to most people. We fear that dying may be painful and we do not know what will happen to us at the point of death.

Some people fear death because they imagine the dying process to be very painful. Death is not painful. In fact, death is often very peaceful and silent even for those suffering from cancers or other terminal illness.

When the physical body is deteriorating day by day from a terminal illness, and pain arises from superficial wound such as bed sores, or deep pain such as bone or nerve pain, death may even be a welcome relief for the sufferer.

We need to distinguish the pain of the physical body from the process of dying. The dying process is a distinct process that is separate from the deterioration of the physical body. At the point of death, there is no pain.

What happens at death is the cessation of the breath and all other physiological functions of the physical body. The heart stops pumping and the blood circulation stops moving. The body stops generating heat, and thus progressively turns cold.

For those who believe that we are more than just a physical body, and that we are in fact spiritual beings, the dying process means much more than just physical death. Death is just a natural process that allows us to discard the physical body as we move into the spiritual realm.

Since our fear of death is due to the fact that we do not know or understand death, it makes sense to familiarise ourselves with it. The more we understand death, the less we fear it. We should therefore cultivate a friendship with death, and be totally familiar with it, just as we are familiar with our friends.

We can cultivate a friendship with death in three simple steps:

1. Establish a link with God.
2. Cultivate a habit of acceptance, instead of blame.
3. Be a blessing to others.


Establish a link with God.

By establishing a link with God, we touch base with our own spirituality. God can be whatever you perceive God to be. For Christians, Muslims and Hindus, that may mean an omnipotent God. For Buddhists, it may mean the Buddha seed within. Atheists may have to come to term with their own spirituality.

Establishing a link with God means re-gaining your spirituality. It leads you closer to the spiritual aspect of yourself. Whether we accept it or not, we are more than just this physical body. When we die, we leave this physical body behind and only our spirituality continues on.

It is therefore essential for us to be familiar with our own spirituality. It is the only part of us that continues after death. This 'fact' is in accordance with all major religions.


Cultivate a Habit of Acceptance.

It is funny how when good things come to us, we readily accept them as though we deserve them or we have worked hard for them, yet when calamities befall us we quickly look for an external source to blame.

This is especially so when misfortunes such as terminal illness befall us. We may blame God, and later blame ourselves or people around us. We should cultivate a habit of neutrality regardless of whether good or bad things come our way. Otherwise, we can become very bitter about life when negative things happened. Looking for someone or something to blame only serve to prolong our own suffering. Death is an enemy when we resist it, but the moment we accept it, it turns into an ally.

However, cultivating a habit of acceptance does not mean not doing anything to correct or improve our conditions. It does not mean, for example, that when we are diagnosed with a terminal illness we do nothing about it. It is only sensible to seek treatment, if it is available to us. On the other hand, it also means we must know and accept when curative treatment is no longer possible. We fear death only when we refuse to face it.

Unfortunately, there are unscrupulous people who would take advantage of our fear of death to sell their 'cure'. In my experience with the terminally ill, I have come across countless stories of dying people being duped into parting with their savings and properties in the hope of achieving a cure.


Be a Blessing to Others.

This is our greatest and most reliable ally at the time of death.

Knowing that we have been helpful to others and that we have tried to live a blameless life takes away the fear of death. If our life has been an honest one, free of any conscious intention to hurt any living beings, we have nothing to fear when death approaches. Our mind will be at peace, undisturbed.

On the other hand, those who lead selfish lives, and harm others to get little advantages for themselves, find themselves imprisoned in tiny, dark cells when they move to the other side.

Therefore, while we still can, we should give our best to the world and to people around us. Lend a helping hand to others and help to lighten their loads. Bring joy to the joyless and comfort to those in need of comfort. There are many who are less fortunate than us. Count our blessings and be a blessing to others.
 
Tim Ong is a medical doctor with more than 14 years of experience in family medicine. He is the author of the online "Build From Within" ezine and "The Book of Transformation". He is also the webmaster of http://www.theselfimprovementsite.com
 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/11399

Sunday, December 23, 2012

Be the Gift of Comfort, Joy and Love This Holiday Season

The holidays can be a stressful time for everyone. When you have lost a loved one, the holidays can be filled with mixed emotions of joy and sorrow. After the loss of my mother, the first Thanksgiving and Christmas were filled with a sense of displacement. My mother always hosted the holidays at her home. Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter and birthdays were always a celebration with many family and friends.

After my mom passed away that all changed. The first few years were an adjustment. I was blessed to be included in my sister's family festivities and when my dad moved back to California we were able to start new family traditions.

Over the holidays my home is still filled with memories of my mother's love for the holidays. I have combined my new holiday decorations and traditions with some of my mom's favorites. Making my mom's favorite holiday recipes each year helps me connect with her spirit and makes me feel like she is right there with me.

As we move into the holiday season, remember that your friends and family members that have lost a loved one may be experiencing deep feelings of loss. Be sure to take the time to connect with them and let them know that they are loved.

Here are a few ways to be the gift they were hoping for this holiday season:
  • Invite your loved one to join you for your holiday gathering. As family members pass away, traditions change and a loved one may not be able to spend the holidays with their family. Including them in your family festivities will help ease the loneliness they may be feeling this time of year.
  • Make a special date to go to dinner, have coffee, or to go shopping to have some private one-on-one time. This special time will allow them the opportunity to talk about their feelings.
  • Help them with holiday arrangements. If they are hosting a holiday gathering, offer to help them prepare the food or offer to go shopping for them to take a little stress off of their shoulders. Ask if they would like you to prepare a favorite food that may have been a family tradition.
  • Take them out for a special day of pampering to a spa or to have a massage. Relaxation and pampering will assist both of you with the stress of the holidays.
  • Celebrate the memories of their loved one by sharing stories and going through photo albums together. This activity will give your friend or family member the opportunity to celebrate their happy memories.

Having the support of friends and family during the holidays can make all the difference. So as you are making out your To Do List for the holidays, be sure to include those friends and family members that might need a little extra love and care this time of year.
 
©2009 Lori Pederson

Lori Pederson, Founder of I Did Not Know What To Say, a website created to inspire and to provide you with tools to assist a love one through the grieving process. If you would like our free newsletter on how to assist your friends and family through the journey of restoring balance in their life after the death of a love one, please visit our website at http://www.ididnotknowwhattosay.com.
 
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lori_Pederson

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Eric Clapton - Tears In Heaven (Official Video)



"Tears in Heaven" is a ballad written by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings about the pain Clapton felt following the death of his four-year-old son, Conor, who fell from a window of the 53rd-floor New York apartment of his mother's friend, on March 20, 1991. Clapton, who arrived at the apartment shortly after the accident, was visibly distraught for months afterwards. This song is one of Clapton's most successful, reaching #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the U.S. The song also spent three weeks at #1 on the American adult contemporary chart in 1992.

Monday, December 17, 2012

Simon talking about the death of his dad



The exact same day when Westlife's first single Swear It Again went to #1, Simon's dad Eric died.

Friday, December 14, 2012

Last Words: Talking About Death

In general, in northern and western culture at least, we are uncomfortable talking about death. This is generally not a problem because there are many other topics to claim our attention. However, the lack of fluency in the language of death can become a problem when the real thing confronts us.

If death were a rarity, only experienced by a few, the fact of such a stumbling block would be a minor matter. Since it is not, since death will come eventually to each one of us and to people we love, it is regrettable to settle for being tongue-tied when other possibilities exist for us.

It begins with the use of the word "death" and its derivatives: died, dying, dead.

We have become a culture unused to such words when it comes to people. Plants die, legislation dies but people "pass" or "cross over." "He got bad news," we allow, or "she's losing ground," we say, as though the process of dying was something that could be exchanged the next day for good news or ground gained.

There are good reasons to learn to call death by its name:
  • it can make it easier for others around us to broach the subject,
  • it can be a concrete way to model for children that death is a part of the experience of this life,
  • it can allow those who are dying to come in from the cold of our conspiracy of silence, and
  • it can help us reclaim the end of life, as its beginning, as a time of opportunity.

One of life's truths is that times of crisis can open doors and create new options. This is true for the crisis embodied in approaching death. Many are the stories of mended relationships, discovery of purpose and finally getting to a place of saying "I love you" right out loud when death draws near.

These things happen because the fact of death shakes us up and sometimes we need that in order to set appropriate priorities and seek to make the most of each day.

To talk about death is to talk about life, ultimately. It is to be open to the possibilities of the moment and to find perspective. It is a call to examine what each day brings and focus upon relationships. It is to acknowledge our mortality and in so doing, to find opportunity to handle matters of meaning and truth.

Linda Watson is a former pastoral and supportive care professional and the author of Facing Death: A Companion in Words and Images, a beautifully illustrated book for the dying and for those who care for and about them.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6274035

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Frontline Documentary Rebroadcast Tues, Dec 11th, PBS

National Funeral Directors Association

Don't forget: Tuesday, December 11, PBS stations thoughout the country will be rebroadcasting the FRONTLINE documentary, The Undertaking.

The Undertaking took television audiences behind the scenes of the Lynch & Sons Funeral Homes, in Clawson and Milford, Michigan, painting a powerful portrayal of the deep and profound commitment funeral service has for the families it serves. What made The Undertaking particularly poignant was seeing the funeral planning process through the eyes of grieving families. Through the experiences of the families featured in the documentary, viewers learn about the value of funerals and the tender ways that funeral directors care for the dying, the dead and the bereaved.

Check local listings to confirm when and on which channel it will be airing in your community. Or, if you can't watch in on television, you can view the entire documentary online: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/undertaking/

Monday, December 10, 2012

Military funeral honors support for veterans



NEW ORLEANS- Marine Forces Reserve units and personnel provide significant support for military funeral honors for our veterans. The Inspector -- Instructor and Reserve Site Support staffs, with augmentation from their Reserve Marines, performed 91 percent of the total funeral honors rendered by the Marine Corps during Calendar Year 2011 (15,366 of 16,943). We anticipate providing funeral honors to more than 16,000 Marine veterans during Calendar Year 2012. Specific authorizations to fund Reserve Marines in the performance of military funeral honors have greatly assisted us at sites such as Bridgeton, Mo., where more than ten funerals are consistently supported each week. As with casualty assistance, we place enormous emphasis on providing timely and professionally executed military funeral honors support. Produced by Cpl. Michael Ito.

Friday, December 7, 2012

Tree Of Memories & Candle Lighting Service 2012 Is Dec 13th


Please join Bryan-Braker Funeral Home for our annual Tree of Memories Remembrance Service held at Bryan-Braker Funeral Home in Fairfield. This year pastor Dave Baker, from Harvest Life Ministry, will speak about bereavement and offer support to families during the upcoming holiday season.

We will have a candle lighting then a remembrance service will be held including holiday music, the reading of the loved ones' names while a family member will receive a memorable ornament, and a reception to follow.

The Tree of Memories Service provides an opportunity for families and friends who have lost a loved one to share their experiences with others who are grieving during this holiday season.

Everyone is welcome to attend regardless of when their loss was, or if their family was served by another funeral home.

Please email a photo of your loved one who passed away right away for a special presentation at the Tree of Memories event. Email to info@bryanbraker.com

Event Location:

1850 W Texas St
Fairfield CA 94533

707-425-4697

Date: 

Thursday, December 13th

Time:

7:00pm

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

A Consistent Place of Healing- Wall of Memories


 This memorial wall is open to anyone who wishes to place a permanent, bronze plaque.  The plaque is custom made for your loved one and can include name, dates, personal history, poem, emblems, artwork, even cast bronze portraits. The Wall of Memories is located on the center pathway on the south side of the Elm Dormitory.

Also, many families are choosing to scatter the cremated remains of their loved one in a favorite place; the ocean, or even in the skies above. While that may seem fitting at the time, it means that you do not have a consistent place to connect with the memories of the person you loved so dearly.

Having such permanent place - in a cemetery, mausoleum, or cremation garden - that can be visited regularly by family and friends is an essential part of the time following a death. It becomes a focal point of memorialization, and gives everyone a special place to go to remember your loved one, or to commemorate important occasions. It can help to make a birthday or anniversary less painful.

A permanent place to reflect on your loved one becomes a way of connecting to a family's past. Visiting the resting place of grandparents or great-grandparents may provide children with an anchor to their personal history. It is a connection to the past, to love shared. It truly honors the relationship you still have – and will always have – with that person.

Saturday, December 1, 2012

Drive-Thru Funeral Home in the Ghetto



A funeral home in Compton offers drive-thru funerals behind bullet proof glass. The dead are laid out behind a glass window no different from a department store display or a McDonald's drive through window. As discussed on Episode 40 of 'The Glory Hole' comedy podcast entitled 'The Voodoo Priests'. www.GloryHoleRadio.com

'The Glory Hole' is Rob Sprance, Franco DelValle, Chris Fortney and Big Mike
Check out 'The Glory Hole' and other great shows at www.GloryHoleRadio.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

You're Not Alone


With our online grief support you’re assured of our commitment to helping you through this difficult time. It doesn’t matter what time of day, or what day of the week you need support, we're here for you. You can find local counseling services, or watch our interactive videos, anytime: 24/7. No matter how you feel at this moment, you have our commitment - you're never alone.

Sunday, November 25, 2012

Fairmont Memorial Park: Mausoleum's

Mausoleum crypts are available for families choosing a burial or cremation with inurnment. Mausoleum entombment is considered to be the finest type of burial known to man. A mausoleum’s solid construction signifies durability, devotion and honor.
 


See more about Fairmont Memorial Park at

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Pre-Planning Can Be Important - Part 2

Pre-Planning Checklist

For many, it feels like there’s an overwhelming amount of things to think about! But in all honesty, taking control of the important things in life just feels good; you know it's the right thing to do for you, and your family.

Arrange and Delegate
The people who know and care about you will be there when you need them. You only need to provide them with instructions, important financial details, and then relax. You’re in good hands.
  • Give your Executor a copy of your Will. Safety deposit boxes are often opened up during the estate settlement process, long after the funeral. Any funeral planning documents therein can be of no help to your executor.
  • Make sure your representative has a list of important account information or telephone numbers for retirement plans, insurance policies, investments, bank accounts, safe-deposit boxes, properties, preferred law and accountant firms and mortuaries. Remind your personal representative that the Social Security Administration will need to be called and, if you're receiving benefits such as those from the Veteran's Administration, they should be contacted as well.
  • Designate a power of attorney to ensure that proper information can be accessed in the event of your illness or death. Make sure the power of attorney over health care or the health care directive and a living will are in place so that your wishes are carried out if you are unable to do so.
  • Make arrangements for telephone and utilities services, and newspaper and magazine deliveries, to be cancelled.
Pay for:
  • Cemetery and memorialization services
  • Funeral arrangements, including clergy, florist and transportation
  • Make arrangements for pets to find a new home.
You can also contact us for additional information. We're pleased to answer any questions you may have, without obligation.

 

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Pre-Planning Can Be Important - Part 1

Pre-Planning Checklist

For many, it feels like there’s an overwhelming amount of things to think about! But in all honesty, taking control of the important things in life just feels good; you know it's the right thing to do for you, and your family.

Prepare

Laying the foundation for a well thought out plan for you or a loved one takes a bit of time, but, it's worth every moment spent. After all, you’re setting the stage for a more relaxed and enjoyable life, because you’ll have the peace-of-mind preparedness brings. Here’s what to do to get started:
  • Prepare a contact list of individuals who should be notified in a medical emergency or death.
  • Write an obituary or simply jot down information you would like included in an obituary.
  • Decide where obituary and memorial information should appear.
Choose the type of service you would like including the burial you prefer and make those arrangements. You will need to decide:
  • Cemetery lot location
  • Casket type; cremation urn type
  • Vault or sectional crypt
  • Type of service: religious, military, non-denominational, or fraternal
  • The contact details for the funeral home you designate to care for you
  • Pallbearers, music, flowers, scripture or other readings
  • Charity to receive donations in lieu of flowers, if donations are preferred
  • Select the speakers and the eulogies that you would want to represent you.
  • Decide what organizations or church will benefit from memorial donations in your name.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Chapel Services

Gathering with friends and family gives everyone the opportunity to share memories, express emotions, and find comforting support. Whether you choose burial or cremation; whether you select a formal funeral or a more relaxed memorial service, the need for acknowledgment of the loss with family and friends is ever present. We can help you create a unique meaningful ceremony to express the genuine individuality of your loved one.

We offer families a beautiful setting in which to come together to honor your loved one. But, you may certainly choose to celebrate their life in a more unique setting. No matter where you decide to gather together, such a service will make a difference in the lives of all who attend.
The stained glass chapel seats 70 adults comfortably and is adjacent to a beautiful courtyard. It is equipped with a tape/cd player, so that you may play your loved ones favorite music. The chapel is available for day and evening visitations and services.

Families may choose to have an outdoor service. This ceremony is conducted in front of the Birch Dormitory. This type of service is ideal for those who love the outdoors or those having military honors.

Fairmont Memorial Park COA 230 | Fairmont Memorial Park Crematory CR# 180
www.FairmontMemorialPark.com

Sunday, November 11, 2012

History of the Holidays: History of Veterans Day



A look at the history of the holiday honoring those who fought for America, both living and dead.

Friday, November 9, 2012

FREE CPR Class For 10-18 Year Olds At United Heart Training Center In Suisun City

Presented By:
United Heart Training Center



FREE CPR Class
November 17 & 18, 2012



For: Ages 10-18 years old
Time: 8:00 am to 6:00 pm



One Harbor Center
Suites 200-240
Suisun City, CA 94585
707-759-5968 

A Donation of $10.00 Will Help Provide Manuals for the Classes

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

We Offer Families A Beautiful Setting And Much More


 Gathering with friends and family gives everyone the opportunity to share memories, express emotions, and find comforting support. Whether you choose burial or cremation; whether you select a formal funeral or a more relaxed memorial service, the need for acknowledgment of the loss with family and friends is ever present. We can help you create a unique meaningful ceremony to express the genuine individuality of your loved one.

We offer families a beautiful setting in which to come together to honor your loved one. But, you may certainly choose to celebrate their life in a more unique setting. No matter where you decide to gather together, such a service will make a difference in the lives of all who attend.

www.FairmontMemorialPark.com

Monday, November 5, 2012

Fairmont Memorial Park's Nature Niches


Fairmont Memorial Park offers a unique cremation memorial urn called Back to Nature. This niche is for cremated remains in an above ground natural setting that is integrated into the landscape. Fairmont Memorial Park has placed these granite urns throughout the courtyard, but these urns may be purchased for your special garden. The Back to Nature urn is a natural unfinished rock with a bronze memorial plaque for names and dates.

www.FairmontMemorialPark.com

Friday, November 2, 2012

Fairmont Memorial Park: Honoring Lives


The staff members of Fairmont Memorial Park will guide your family in creating a meaningful ceremony to honor the life and memory of a loved one.

A ceremony can be anything you wish it to be: simple or elaborate, traditional or unique. No matter how it's tailored, such a ceremony is an important step in recovering from loss. It’s important to take the time to acknowledge the uniqueness of the deceased: the individuality of their personality, and the uniqueness of their life's path. Not just for them, but for you; it affirms the relationship, and leads to healing after loss.

Honoring their life is truly an act of love – for the both of you.

www.FairmontMemorialPark.com

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Frédéric Chopin - Marche Funèbre - Funeral March



Many of us have only heard very short renditions of this famous funeral march song, and most of them were used in cartoons and comedy schetches. It's really a beautiful piece of music, so we thought we would share it with you.

From Piano Sonata Op.35 No.2 played by Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli.

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Eric Clapton - Tears in Heaven



This is the acoustic version of the famous Tears in Heaven song by Eric Clapton recorded on MTV Unplugged.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Chapel of Light at Fairmont Memorial Park



The Chapel of Light offers indoor niches in a beautiful setting. The niches are all glass front so that you may decorate with pictures and/or mementos. Generous use of stained glass and natural skylight within the design of the Chapel of Light, evokes a feeling of peacefulness while visiting. The indoor chapel is equipped with security locks that require an entry code. Each purchaser is given this code.

See more at www.FairfieldCemeteries.com

Sunday, October 21, 2012

Fairmont Memorial Park

We have years of experience caring for families, from all walks of life. Each family comes to us because they know we are the leaders in our profession, dedicated to excellence in service, and have the highest integrity.



At Fairmont Memorial Park, we offer a wide variety of locations to choose from and prices to fit all budgets. To schedule a no obligation tour of the memorial park, please contact the office at (707) 425-4697. COA230. www.FairfieldCemeteries.com

Thursday, October 18, 2012

When a Death Occurs At Home or at Work

When a death occurs at home or in the workplace, a family member or co-worker should contact emergency personnel. If the death occurs at home with family or friends present, and the person is under a physician's care, the family will want to call us directly.

However, if the death occurs in a residence and no one is there at the time of death, the police will need to be notified and respond to the residence before the deceased is removed from their home.

If in any case you are not sure of who to notify or what to do, you may call Bryan-Braker, and we'll assist you in notifying the proper agencies.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Those Important Questions . . .

If there is no pre-arrangements in place, there are several other questions that you will need to have answered in regards to the death of your loved one:
  • Do I have to have embalming?
  • Do I need to purchase a casket?
  • What about cemetery arrangements?
  • Does the family have to engage the services of a minister?
  • What type of service should we have?


By contacting our staff, we'll be able to help answer your questions and assist in making the appropriate plans. You can reach us at (707) 425-4697.

However, one of the best ways to make sure that all of your questions and desires are taken care of is to make pre-arrangements. This is as simple as outlining your wishes to having all of the details written down and the financial arrangements prepaid. Please contact one of our staff at (707) 425-4697 to learn more about pre-arrangement.

Friday, October 12, 2012

What to Expect When You Arrive at the Funeral Home

One of the first things the funeral arranger will do is to provide you with our general price list. He or she will then guide you through the entire arrangement process, explaining how you can create a memorable personal celebration of your loved one's life. This is not a one-way conversation; we want to hear your ideas and desires, and use them as the foundation for the arrangement process.

This process may include:
  • Preparing and filing the official death certificate
  • Scheduling the location, date and time of services or events
  • Selecting a casket, urn or other items
  • Preparing an obituary notice
  • Scheduling vehicles
  • Selecting pallbearers


You may also sign necessary authorizations or make arrangements to have them signed by the appropriate family members.

We’d like you to bring any photos, a favorite song, or memorabilia so that you and your funeral arranger can better discuss how you would like your loved one to be remembered. Having these things, and knowing their favorite song or favorite gathering place – even their favorite activity – will help us create a truly fitting memorial service.

Our funeral arrangers will assist you in planning a loving tribute that captures the spirit of the person whose life you wish to honor. To learn more about personalizing the service, please read the Honoring Life section of this Web site. The funeral arranger will discuss personalization with you during your arrangement conference.

The following checklist will help you remember what information about the decedent and items will be needed when meeting with a funeral arranger.
  • Full legal name
  • Home address
  • Social Security number
  • Date of birth
  • Place of birth
  • Father's name
  • Mother's maiden name
  • Veteran's discharge papers (DD-214)
  • Recent Photograph
  • Highest education
  • Occupation
  • Place of burial (if applicable)
  • Clothing
  • Clergy name and phone number
  • Survivors (name and relationship)
  • Insurance policies (if applicable)

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Last Words: Talking About Death by Linda F Watson

In general, in northern and western culture at least, we are uncomfortable talking about death. This is generally not a problem because there are many other topics to claim our attention. However, the lack of fluency in the language of death can become a problem when the real thing confronts us.

If death were a rarity, only experienced by a few, the fact of such a stumbling block would be a minor matter. Since it is not, since death will come eventually to each one of us and to people we love, it is regrettable to settle for being tongue-tied when other possibilities exist for us.

It begins with the use of the word "death" and its derivatives: died, dying, dead.

We have become a culture unused to such words when it comes to people. Plants die, legislation dies but people "pass" or "cross over." "He got bad news," we allow, or "she's losing ground," we say, as though the process of dying was something that could be exchanged the next day for good news or ground gained.

There are good reasons to learn to call death by its name:
  • it can make it easier for others around us to broach the subject,
  • it can be a concrete way to model for children that death is a part of the experience of this life,
  • it can allow those who are dying to come in from the cold of our conspiracy of silence, and
  • it can help us reclaim the end of life, as its beginning, as a time of opportunity.

One of life's truths is that times of crisis can open doors and create new options. This is true for the crisis embodied in approaching death. Many are the stories of mended relationships, discovery of purpose and finally getting to a place of saying "I love you" right out loud when death draws near.

These things happen because the fact of death shakes us up and sometimes we need that in order to set appropriate priorities and seek to make the most of each day.

To talk about death is to talk about life, ultimately. It is to be open to the possibilities of the moment and to find perspective. It is a call to examine what each day brings and focus upon relationships. It is to acknowledge our mortality and in so doing, to find opportunity to handle matters of meaning and truth.
 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6274035

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Thousands turn out for Vacaville's annual Kid Fest


". . . On Saturday, when Andrews Park in Vacaville was abuzz with happy children during the annual Kid Fest.

With thousands milling in the sloping park off East Monte Vista Avenue and Main Street, that seemed to be the idea. By 1 p.m., it was hard to tell who brought whom to the event -- children with parents, grandparents and other relatives in tow or the other way around."

See the rest of this article from the The Reporter for Vacaville:

 http://www.thereporter.com/ci_21719062/thousands-turn-out-vacavilles-annual-kid-fest

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Join Us At The Vacaville Kid Fest, Saturday, October 6th 10am - 3pm in Andrews Park


Vacaville Kid Fest was started in 1999, when an idea was born to create a "Children's Festival", a place where families could come and have a day of activities with their children at very little or no cost, and also have the opportunity to learn about many of the services and resources that were available to children and families. We adopted the theme "For the Child in all of us".

A group of City of Vacaville representatives, ranging from business owners and managers, nonprofit groups and media people were approached with the idea and met it with enthusiasm. And thus, Kid Fest was born.

The first Kid Fest Core Committee consisted of Shauna Manina, Meaghan O'Neill from Vacaville Police Dept., Linnea Dischinger from Vacaville Fire Dept., Todd Grames and Suzanne Green from Community Services Dept., and Reggie Hubbard from Housing & Redevelopment Dept. Other business people from The Reporter, Downtown Vacaville Business Improvement District, and others all committed to the vision of a day of low cost or no cost activities, free resources, and fun.

Our first event in 1999 had 1 stage and 40 booths, with everything from food, crafters and merchandise vendors, a wide range of social service and community nonprofit groups, free children's games and entertainment, bounce houses, and a very strong focus on child safety and health. From the beginning, a large component of the event has been the presence of Vacaville Fire and Police Depts., with their equipment displays, children's fire muster, and safety information.

By 2001, there were 2 stages of entertainment and over 120 booths participating in the event. The committee members have changed over the years, but the event has continued, and become part of the fabric of what makes Vacaville a family oriented community. The focus remains on child and family safety and health.

See more about this wonderful organization at www.VacavilleKidFest.org

See you there!

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

You're Not Alone

With our online grief support you’re assured of our commitment to helping you through this difficult time. It doesn’t matter what time of day, or what day of the week you need support, we're here for you. You can access online counseling services, join in group grief support, or watch our interactive videos, anytime: 24/7. No matter how you feel at this moment, you have our commitment - you're never alone.

See more here: http://www.bryanbraker.com/grief-and-healing/

Saturday, September 29, 2012

Burial or Cremation?

Usually, people are clear on this point. In fact, your loved one may have told you, or someone else, exactly how they wish to be cared for. But it can be a hard decision for some families, especially when the wishes of the deceased were never clearly stated. If that's the case, please know we're able to help you come to the perfect decision for your loved one, and for you.

Once you decide, the finer details come into focus. If you've chosen burial, then selection of the casket, vault, and desired cemetery follows. Naturally, we’re here to help you.

If cremation is your choice, then you'll need to make the next decision: whether the cremated remains will be going home with a loved one, placed in a columbarium niche, scattered in the blue ocean, or buried on cemetery grounds. Bryan-Braker Funeral Home does own and operated their own crematory, so no one leaves our care.

In some communities, there's the option for a 'green burial.' If that's what your loved one would prefer, we'll help you select an environmentally-friendly choice.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

New Orleans Jazz Funeral for Tuba Player Kerwin James



Funerals are as unique as people and as diverse as culture. Here's one way it's done in New Orleans.

A traditional New Orleans Jazz Funeral for the late tuba player Kerwin James. He died in Oct. 2007. Alot of viewers have been asking whats the reason for rocking the casket, it's so he can dance one last time. I also have a Mardi Gras Black Indian Funeral video on here too. I must WARN you it is'nt your "typical" funeral.

Courtesy of  www.onenawlins.com

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Many Ways of Honoring Life

Honoring the achievements of your loved ones and celebrating the life you shared together are the cornerstones of healing after loss



It's All about the Relationship
It's All about the Relationship
Honoring the life of your loved one means you value the relationship you shared. We look forward to helping you decide how to celebrate that bond, and honor the unique individual you've lost. We can make suggestions to enhance your tribute ideas. Together we will create a fitting and memorable event. Contact us today to discuss the possibilities.




Tribute Videos
Tribute Videos
Your family photographs are skillfully blended with wonderful graphic images and music, to create an elegantly emotive cinematic video. It can be an integral part of any funeral or memorial service. After the ceremony, the video is sure to become a treasured family keepsake. And, we can make copies as gifts for family and friends.




Personalized Printing
Personalized Printing
Our memorial bookmarks, service programs, prayer cards, and folders can all include a favorite photo, poem or prose tribute to your loved one. We can add a uniquely caring element to your service, so your guests can leave with a treasured keepsake.




Memorial Websites
Memorial Websites
The traditional newspaper obituary is quickly being replaced by the memorial website. We’ve taken the concept further than anyone else. Our memorial sites are not just a repository of family photos and videos; they’re Web 2.0 tools for connecting with family and friends, all in honor of your loved one. We invite you to take a tour, so you can see its power to celebrate connections, honor a life, and record the love you shared.



Live Funeral Webcasting
Live Funeral Webcasting
The newest innovation in funeral service, webcasting, allows everyone you love to attend your loved one's service. A webcast is viewed live over the Internet, and archived for delayed viewing.



Bagpiper
Music is important part of a funeral service. The bagpipes have been commemorating the loss of loved ones for hundreds of years. The Bagpipes are a powerfully touch to our deepest emotions, and express feelings that words alone may fail to convey.

Musician & Soloist

The music at the services should reflect your loved one’s life. Live musicians up lift the spirit; a complete band, soloist, pianist, guitarist, or any other type of music. A bagpipe at the graveside or a trumpet playing taps can be very memorable.
 


Dove Release
A flock of white doves are usually released at the end of the graveside ceremony. The flock circles overhead several times before flying back to their home. The dove symbolizes the departed spirit making its final journey home.





Horse-Drawn Funeral Coach
The vintage, late 19th century horse-drawn funeral coach is a unique tribute available for graveside services. In this time-honored manner, a horse-drawn funeral coach adds a touch of elegance to any service.





Butterfly Release
Many people believe that butterflies symbolize spirit, representing freedom and beauty as they take flight. When we experience the vital connection between butterflies and nature, we tend to instinctively feel that peace and harmony are truly around us. Why not invite a butterfly release to your loved one’s memorial service, to help celebrate a life lived?

Learn More about Honoring Your Loved One
You knew your loved one better than anyone else. We’ve got years of experience. Together, we’ll design the perfect memorial or funeral service for your loved one. If you're ready to discuss the options, or simply have questions about our services, please call us at (707) 425-4697, or send us an email inquiry.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Chapel of Light - Fairmont Memorial Park


 


The Chapel of Light offers indoor niches in a beautiful setting. The niches are all glass front so that you may decorate with pictures and/or mementos. Generous use of stained glass and natural skylight within the design of the Chapel of Light, evokes a feeling of peacefulness while visiting. The indoor chapel is equipped with security locks that require an entry code. Each purchaser is given this code.

Monday, September 17, 2012

Funeral Etiquette: But, What Shouldn't You Do?

Don't feel that you have to stay.
If you make a visit during calling hours there's no reason your stay has to be a lengthy one.

Don't be afraid to laugh.
Remembering their loved one fondly can mean sharing a funny story or two. Just be mindful of the time and place; if others are sharing, then you may do so too. There is simply no good reason you shouldn't talk about the deceased in a happy, positive tone.

Don't feel you have to view the deceased if there is an open casket.
Act according to what is comfortable to you.

Don't allow your children to be a disturbance.
If you feel they might be, then leave them with a sitter. But, if the deceased meant something to them, it's a good idea to invite them to share in the experience.

Don't leave your cell phone on.
Switch it off before entering the funeral home, or better yet, leave it in the car. All too often, we see people checking their cell phones for messages during the services.

Don't neglect to step into the receiving line.
Simply say how sorry you are for their loss, offer up your own name and how you knew the deceased.

Don't be too hard on yourself if you make a mistake.
Everyone does, and you can be sure that an apology may be all that's needed to mend and soothe.

When it's all over, always remember to continue to offer support and love to the bereaved. The next few months are a time when grieving friends and relatives could need you most. Let them know that your support did not end with the funeral.

Saturday, September 15, 2012

Funeral Etiquette: Things To Do

Making the Most of a Difficult Time

It’s important to know what religious, ethnic or personal considerations you need to take into account. And it’s also important to be respectful of the emotions of close family members.
Here are a few things expected of you:
  • Offer an expression of sympathy.
    Sometimes we are at a loss for words when encountering something as final as death. Simply saying "I'm sorry for your loss" is usually enough. Be respectful and listen attentively when spoken to, and offer your own words of condolence.
  • Find out the dress code.
    These days almost anything goes, but only when you know it's the right anything. In fact, sometimes the deceased has specified the dress code; “hawaiian clothing” is a common request. If you can't learn the wishes of the family, then dress conservatively, and avoid bright colors.
  • Give a gift.
    It doesn't matter if it is flowers, a donation to a charity or a commitment of service to the family at a later date; as always, "it's the thought that counts." Always make sure to provide the family with a signed card, so they know what gift was given, and by whom.
  • Sign the register book.
    Include not only your name, but your relationship to the deceased: co-worker, gym buddy, or casual acquaintance from the golf club. This helps family place who you are in future.
  • Keep in touch.
    It's sometimes awkward for you to do so, but for most people the grieving doesn't end with a funeral.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Honoring Life: It's All about the Relationship

Honoring the life of your loved one means you value the relationship you shared. We look forward to helping you decide how to celebrate that bond, and honor the unique individual you've lost.

We can make suggestions to enhance your tribute ideas. Together we will create a fitting and memorable event. Contact us today to discuss the possibilities.

Monday, September 10, 2012

Green Joins Bryan-Braker Funeral Home

By The Davis Enterprise
 

August 21, 2012

Link: http://www.davisenterprise.com/business/green-joins-bryan-braker-funeral-home/

Bryan-Braker Funeral Home has announced the appointment of Titus Green Sr. as funeral director.

Green, of Fairfield, has more than 20 years of mortuary operations experience. Most recently, he served as funeral director for C.P Bannon Mortuary in Oakland. He also was a professional embalmer and funeral arranger for Lewis and Ribbs Mortuary in San Francisco and was a professional embalmer at Whitted-Williams Funeral Home, also located in the Bay Area.

“Titus exemplifies what we are all about,” said Craig Bryan, owner of Bryan-Braker, in a news release. “He truly cares about those who are going through the difficult, complex times of bereavement. His dedication, compassion and attention to every detail are clearly why we wanted to make him a part of our tight-knit family business.”

Green attended Jefferson State College in Birmingham, Ala., and received a mortuary science diploma at San Francisco College of Mortuary Science.

Bryan-Braker Funeral Home has offices in the Fairfield, Vacaville and Dixon areas, which include burials, cremation and above-ground interment. The company specializes in traditional, contemporary and veterans’ services.

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Welcome To Our New Blog

Thanks for stopping by. Welcome to our brand new blog. There is a lot of fear and trepidation about death, dying, funerals and the idea of planning them. It is our intent to soften that with this blog by helping to understand different aspects of what we do and how we serve. There is no such thing as normal to us. Each client, or family has their own preferences and desires. We have the ability to be dignified and flexible enough to accommodate virtually every one's needs.

We hope to share much more with you very soon.